Modern Sporting Rifle Evolution
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Nomadic

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Reply with quote  #1 
Too many times I am having my shoulder collapse while seating a bullet. This has happened with my 100 Accubond and my 100 MDWS. Last night I loaded 6 rounds of once-fired Hornady brass with 100 MDWS seating to 2.260. 4 of them had the shoulder collapse. I chamfered and deburred all 6 cases. I don’t think this load is compressed, and if so, just barely. Is this a neck tension problem? Do I need to replace my chamfer tool on my RCBS tool mate? Problem with my seating die? (I just replaced guide sleeve and stem with VLD). Is it my technique? I generally set bullet, run case part way up, bring it down and rotate shell holder, run it all the way up.

When sizing I bumped the shoulder back about .003. I’m using Hornady match die that I bought from MDWS years ago. I have had this problem off and on. It’s getting frustrating. Last few times I have loaded Ammo for hunting or testing, in Hornady brass or LC brass, I have collected 10-15 rounds I have to pull.

Also, can I save the brass by resizing? Or is it now scrap?
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wikster1983

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hornady seating die? If so, I have issues with the 2pc seater, inner comes out out outer, and when you go to seat the bullet the outer comes in contact with neck to crush shoulder in. Maybe not your issue, but something to look at/ watch for. Hard to tell without being there to actually feel problem happening. I personally very much dislike hornady seating dies for this reason, but it is what it is.
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Rifter

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Reply with quote  #3 
In my experience, the only reason you crush the shoulder is due to either a poor fit of the seating plug or lack of sufficient chamfer on the inside of the neck, and you have to have sufficient inside neck sizing to allow the bullet to enter before seating pressure builds up.

The Hornady seater dies are excellent in design.  That's all I use, and have used for every caliber I've loaded over the last 20 years.  The sliding sleeve is there to ensure the bullet aligns with the centerline of the case for straight seating.  Most have a crimp shoulder so you must have the die at the proper height to avoid running the case into that shoulder.  The seater plug needs to match the ogive of the bullet to spread out the seating force evenly.  Otherwise the bottom edge focuses all the force at one point and that can distort things, making seating harder. 

You want a tight neck/bullet fit as far as tension goes, but if the inside diameter is too tight and the case necks are work hardened they won't open up to let the bullet start seating before the shoulder collapses.   Measure the expander plug to make sure it isn't too small compared to the ID of the neck.  It also doesn't hurt to dip the case neck in motor mica or graphite powder when seating.  Either of those will help the bullet start easier, and the base of the bullet will push it down ahead of the edge as it goes in.  It won't effect bullet pull at all.  If case necks are on the third or more reload, then the brass is also likely to be work hardened, and it won't want to stretch to allow the bullet to seat easily.  If that's the case, annealing every third load will help a lot by lessening the work hardening.  Just be sure you anneal properly and don't overcook the brass.  Use Tempilaq to avoid that.  Don't depend on your eyeball to determine proper annealing, it isn't accurate enough (and it doesn't matter how long you've been loading - nobody's eyes are accurate enough for that).

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BIGGDAWG

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Reply with quote  #4 
check your size button it may be a touch small, too much neck tension when seating will do that also check your seating die, back die off a few turns. raise ram with just a case, turn die down till slight resistance is felt then back off 1/2 to1 turn. lock it down. now adjust seating depth. also a burr in the neck can cause it. i have it happen more with flat base bullets personally and when i forget to chamfer the cases.
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